Who wants to go for a car ride?

By October 28, 2016Uncategorized

Cats, dogs, small mammals and reptiles all need to go into the car at some point (ahem, annual vet visit perhaps?) and because of this, we’ve whipped up a few tips to make the trip less stressful for all involved.

Transporting your cat

  • If possible, leave the carrier out in your house with the door open a couple of days prior to the appointment – your cat will likely come investigate it at some point and this may help make it less scary for him/her when it is actually time for the vet visit
  • A cat should never be in a vehicle if not properly secured in an enclosed carrier
  • Use a “happy pheromone” such as Feliway to help ease your cat’s stress – spray on a blanket or towel prior to placing your pet in the carrier. Use this as bedding or over top of the carrier to keep it partially covered.
  • Refrain from using a box, or anything that doesn’t have a secure lid as your cat may inadvertently escape while you are driving and this could be very hazardous

Transporting your dog

  • If possible, leave the carrier out in your house with the door open a couple of days prior to the appointment – your dog will likely come investigate it at some point and this may help make it less scary for him/her when it is actually time for the vet visit
  • Use a “happy pheromone” such as DAP to help ease your dog’s stress – spray on a blanket or towel prior to placing your pet in the carrier. Use this as bedding or over top of the carrier to keep it partially covered.
  • Refrain from using a box, or anything that doesn’t have a secure lid as your dog may inadvertently escape while you are driving and this could be very hazardous
  • If your dog will be using a leash/harness instead of a carrier
  • Using a dog-specific seat belt/harness, ensure that your dog is safely buckled in to one of the back seats. Never allow your dog to ride in the front passenger seat because of the risk of the airbag being deployed.
  • Have your pet’s harness/collar and leash ready prior to entering the vet clinic. Even well trained dogs can get distracted easily in unusual situations. Using a leash is for the benefit and safety of your pet and others that are in the clinic as not all other pets are friendly!

Transporting your small mammal

  • A small pet should never be in a vehicle if not properly secured in an enclosed carrier
  • Refrain from using a box, or anything that doesn’t have a secure lid as your pet may inadvertently escape while you are driving and this could be very hazardous
  • The carrier should be small enough to fit into your vehicle and be carried by hand into the clinic easily but also large enough for your small pet to turn around completely in
  • If your small mammal’s regular enclosure is too large to easily transport, you may want to consider getting an appropriate sized “travel carrier” for your pet

Transporting your reptile

  • A reptile should never be in a vehicle if not properly secured in an enclosed carrier
  • Rubbermaid or plastic containers with air holes and a tight fitting lid work great for transportation
  • Line your pet reptile’s carrier/container with towels or fleece
  • Use a portable heating pad (such as a bean bag, hot water bottle) and keep it lightly warmed and covered in a towel so that your pet does not get too cold. Make sure it is not too hot, though, as that can burn your reptile.

Tips for All Pets

  • In the winter months, pre-warm the car and in the summer months, pre-cool the car with air conditioning. Never leave your pet unattended while in a vehicle, especially during the summer months (heat stroke can happen quickly and it is often fatal)
  • Ensure the carrier is secured into the car with a seat belt and never put the carrier in the front seat because of the risk of the airbag being deployed

Tell us, how does your pet react to car rides?

LifeLearn Admin

Author LifeLearn Admin

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